Published: January 16, 2018

Employers and employees alike may see big changes in the upcoming year regarding state laws dealing with sexual assault and harassment in the workplace. Following the allegations against former film producer Harvey Weinstein and the rise of the #MeToo movement, the legislative floodgates have opened as a number of states have proposed bills attempting to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Published: August 31, 2017

In a long awaited decision, a Texas federal judge struck down the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) overtime rule finding that the Department of Labor (“DOL”) exceeded its delegated authority. The rule, which was blocked by injunction in November 2016, was set to raise the white collar exemption minimum salary requirement from $23,660 per year to $47,476 per year effective December 1, 2016.
 

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Published: July 24, 2017

In an opinion issued July 19, the Second Circuit vacated a jury verdict in favor of the employer, ruling that the district court judge had instructed the jury to use an incorrect standard of proof under the Family and Medical Leave Act. Woods v. START Treatment & Recovery Centers, Inc., No. 16-1318 (2d Cir. July 19, 2017). The correct causation standard, the Court held, was not whether the employer would not have fired her “but for” her exercise of rights under the FMLA.

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Published: July 13, 2017

On July 3, 2017, the Eighth Circuit overturned a National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) decision finding that a Jimmy John’s franchisee, MikLin Enterprises, Inc. (“MikLin”) violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) when it discharged and disciplined employees who publicly distributed posters suggesting that consumers may become sick from eating sandwiches made by sick workers. The posters, which were distributed during a union organizing drive, were part of a campaign to demand paid sick leave.

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Published: February 27, 2012

Arnstein & Lehr Chicago Partner Jason Tremblay authored the article titled “How to avoid defamation and reverse discrimination claims when investigating harassment,” which appeared in the February 22 edition of Inside Counsel. In the article, Mr. Tremblay explains that an employer must conduct its investigation in the most confidential manner possible and be extremely careful about how it characterizes the harassing employee to reduce their potential liability.

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