N. Scott Pierce

N. Scott Pierce

Partner

Contact Info

Phone: (617) 912-0973
Fax: (857) 400-3784

Primary Office

Boston
131 Dartmouth Street
Suite 501
Boston, MA 02116

N. Scott Pierce

Scott Pierce has been practicing patent law for 30 years. Some areas of technology include: organic, polymer and physical chemistry; biotechnology; and biomechanical, chemical, electromechanical and software engineering. Examples of some recent specific applications include: optogenetics; biomechatronics; neuroelectromagnetics; neuromechanics; waveform tomography; medical imaging; nanotechnology; meta and neural networks; drug design; robotic, orthotic and exoskeletal prosthetics; intravascular prosthetics; hemoglobin blood substitutes; semiconductors; heterojunction bipolar transistors; lithium ion batteries; living cationic polymerization; and the internet of things.

Scott has also been an adjunct professor at Suffolk University Law School since 2003. During that time Scott has developed a keen interest in the development of patent law in legal history, having published two dozen articles commenting on historical foundations of several modern legal doctrines, including the written description requirement, utility, inherency, experimental use, inventorship, double patenting and obviousness. Scott has also written commentary on the America Invents Act and three articles on patent eligibility under the U.S. Supreme Court cases of Mayo v. Prometheus and Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank. His most recent published academic article challenges the judicial doctrine of preemption that underpins patent eligibility under both Mayo and Alice. Click here for a list of selected publications.

In addition to his state bar and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office admissions, Scott is admitted to appear before the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts and U.S. Supreme Court.

Credentials and Accolades

Memberships and Affiliations

American Bar Association

Massachusetts Bar Association

Boston Patent Law Association

American Intellectual Property Law Association

Tau Beta Pi

Education

J.D., State University of New York School of Law at Buffalo

  • Senior Editor, Buffalo Law Review

MBA, University of Connecticut

B.S., University of Connecticut

B.S.E. University of Connecticut

Bar Admissions

Connecticut
Massachusetts
U.S. Patent & Trademark Office

Scott Pierce has been practicing patent law for 30 years. Some areas of technology include: organic, polymer and physical chemistry; biotechnology; and biomechanical, chemical, electromechanical and software engineering. Examples of some recent specific applications include: optogenetics; biomechatronics; neuroelectromagnetics; neuromechanics; waveform tomography; medical imaging; nanotechnology; meta and neural networks; drug design; robotic, orthotic and exoskeletal prosthetics; intravascular prosthetics; hemoglobin blood substitutes; semiconductors; heterojunction bipolar transistors; lithium ion batteries; living cationic polymerization; and the internet of things.

Scott has also been an adjunct professor at Suffolk University Law School since 2003. During that time Scott has developed a keen interest in the development of patent law in legal history, having published two dozen articles commenting on historical foundations of several modern legal doctrines, including the written description requirement, utility, inherency, experimental use, inventorship, double patenting and obviousness. Scott has also written commentary on the America Invents Act and three articles on patent eligibility under the U.S. Supreme Court cases of Mayo v. Prometheus and Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank. His most recent published academic article challenges the judicial doctrine of preemption that underpins patent eligibility under both Mayo and Alice. Click here for a list of selected publications.

In addition to his state bar and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office admissions, Scott is admitted to appear before the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts and U.S. Supreme Court.